Richmond Community Choir To Begin Rehearsals – New Members Welcome

The Richmond Community Choir has been under the leadership of Director Joe Agosta for the past eighteen years, and are looking to begin rehearsals for the Spring Concert Series on Monday, February 6 at 7 p.m.  Rehearsals are held in the music practice Room of Richmond High School, at 35320 Division Road in Richmond.  Joe says, everyone is invited to join this community choir, there are no auditions or try-outs for the choir itself, however, there is a chorale group, within the choir.   Joe further stated, there are approximately 150 overall members, with a usual concert series seeing 90-100 singers participating.  He says, it is a “real” community choir in that members come from all over to participate, and concerts see a standing-room only audience.   If you would like to be a part of the choir, you can just attend the first practice and If you would like more information log on to richmondcommunitychoir.com or call Director Joe Agosta, at 810-305-1385

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Local News

Red Cross Critically Needs Donors After Winter Weather Adds To Severe Blood Shortage

Following several rounds of severe winter weather in many parts of the country, the American Red Cross urges eligible blood and platelet donors to help restock its shelves to overcome a shortage.  Since Dec. 1, about 300 blood drives across 27 states have been forced to cancel due to inclement winter weather, resulting in more…

Red Cross Critically Needs Donors After Winter Weather Adds To Severe Blood Shortage

Following several rounds of severe winter weather in many parts of the country, the American Red Cross urges eligible blood and platelet donors to help restock its shelves to overcome a shortage.  Since Dec. 1, about 300 blood drives across 27 states have been forced to cancel due to inclement winter weather, resulting in more than 10,500 blood and platelet donations going uncollected. Despite the weather, hospital patients still rely on transfusions.  Blood donor Jim Taylor knows how it feels to have a loved one waiting for a transfusion. His son Aaron was born with a rare liver condition. In the short two months of his life, he received 115 blood products. Taylor said each transfusion gave his family more time with Aaron, so he encourages others to give.  “When the Red Cross says there is a shortage, they are not exaggerating,” said Taylor. “I now know from experience that what they are saying is somewhere there is a father waiting on the donation that will save his son’s life. When the Red Cross asks for help, what that means is a new dad is praying for a miracle.”   To make an appointment to give blood, download the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Donors are encouraged to make appointments and complete the RapidPass online health history questionnaire at redcrossblood.org/rapidpass to save time when donating.

Upcoming Blood Drives in St. Clair County:

Marine City – 1/30/2017: 12:45 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Marine City Fire Department, 200 South Parker Street

Port Huron – 2/9/2017: 10 a.m. – 3:45 p.m., St. Clair County Community College, 323 Erie Street

Marine City – 2/12/2017: 8 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Holy Cross, 610 South Water Street

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Michigan Tribes Continue To tackle Obesity With Ad Campaign

Phase 2 of a media campaign urging Native Americans to get healthy for the ones they love launched January 1st in seven cities across Michigan. What Moves You?, features inspiring images of Native American parents exercising with their children, highlighting family responsibility and mentorship as motivation for being more physically active. The goal is to…

Michigan Tribes Continue To tackle Obesity With Ad Campaign

Phase 2 of a media campaign urging Native Americans to get healthy for the ones they love launched January 1st in seven cities across Michigan. What Moves You?, features inspiring images of Native American parents exercising with their children, highlighting family responsibility and mentorship as motivation for being more physically active. The goal is to reduce the risk for chronic diseases while improving long-term health.  “My words to him every day are “You are my HERO!” Honestly he has been hitting the gym every day of the week and it has inspired me to be healthier. The more activities I can at least try to keep up with him, keeps our father son competition going,” said Billy McNamara, a parent featured in the campaign and a member of the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians Tribe and Natural Resources Chairman.  Six federally recognized tribes and one urban American Indian agency in Michigan, will distribute campaign materials and build upon the success of year 1 of What Moves You?, to encourage their communities to continue being physically active: The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe, The Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, The Hannahville Indian Community, The Bay Mills Indian Community and American Indian Health and Family Services.  What Moves You? ads have rolled out in the Michigan cities where the participating tribes and health center are located, including Detroit, Mount Pleasant, Fulton, Grand Rapids, Wilson, Brimley, Sault Ste. Marie, Petoskey and Baraga. The ads appear online and locally on billboards, at convenience stores and in various publications.  The campaign website, MoveMoreNow.org, provides information about the benefits of exercise, outlines physical activity recommendations and highlights different types of activities to do year-round. It also includes local and online fitness resources.  What Moves You? is part of the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH)- Journey to Wellness initiative, a multi-year effort led by the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan to improve the health and quality of life for Native Americans in Michigan. Research shows that over 65% of Native Americans in Michigan are overweight and obese.[1] “Promoting regular physical activity empowers those with disease to feel actively involved in their own treatment and encourages everyone to take personal responsibility for their own health,” said Cathy Edgerly, REACH Program Manager at the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan.  The project is funded by the CDC and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

[1] Kaiser Family Foundation. Overweight and Obesity Rates for Adults by Race/Ethnicity. Retrieved from http://kff.org/other/state-indicator/adult-overweightobesity-rate-by-re/.

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Smart 9-1-1

Smart 911 was presented to the St. Clair County Commissioners at Thursday night’s meeting, and according to County Administrator Karry Hepting, if St. Clair County chooses to be part of that system, residents would sign up and add what they would want responders to know in case of an emergency.  She says if you ever…

Smart 9-1-1

Karry Hepting

Smart 911 was presented to the St. Clair County Commissioners at Thursday night’s meeting, and according to County Administrator Karry Hepting, if St. Clair County chooses to be part of that system, residents would sign up and add what they would want responders to know in case of an emergency.  She says if you ever would need to call 9-1-1, the call taker would be able to use your information to save valuable time when seconds might count.  When a person is calling 9-1-1, it can be a very chaotic environment and there could be a great deal of panic involved.  If they have preloaded a profile responders would automatically have useful information, even if the person cannot relay all needed information at that time.  If the county chooses to sign on within the next month, the State of Michigan will cover the cost for the first 18 months of this pilot program, allowing the county to find out if the program is something that would work for our county.

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Higley-Zuehlke Guilty On All Charges For The Second Time

Trial number two for Judy Higley-Zuehlke netted the same results as her first – guilty on all charges. Forty-six year old Higley-Zuehlke was found guilty of lying to a police officer during a violent crime investigation; concealing the death of an individual; tampering with evidence; and second-degree murder in connection with the death of John Allen,…

Higley-Zuehlke Guilty On All Charges For The Second Time

Judy Katherine Higley-Zuehlke

Trial number two for Judy Higley-Zuehlke netted the same results as her first – guilty on all charges. Forty-six year old Higley-Zuehlke was found guilty of lying to a police officer during a violent crime investigation; concealing the death of an individual; tampering with evidence; and second-degree murder in connection with the death of John Allen, her former boyfriend.  The body of Allen was found by his brother James Allen on February 3, 2014, in his Port Huron home.  This second trial began two weeks ago, and it took the jury just over two hours to come back with the guilty verdict.  In October 2014, she began serving a prison sentence of 26 to 51 years, and in April of of last year, a new trial was ordered by St. Clair County Circuit Judge Michael West, as new evidence showed a match of DNA on a thermometer of Robert Card, who has been bound over to stand trial on an open murder charge in Allen’s death.  Sentencing for Higley-Zuehlke has been scheduled for 8:30 a.m. on Feb.  23 before Judge West.

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